Keller on Kavanaugh (Sorta)

I am taking a break from the ongoing series of reflections on worship in the contemporary American church this week.  The previously scheduled look at pastors and GQ will appear next week, Lord willing.

It’s been a long 10 days or so in many ways, and this past weekend I found helpful (once again) thefDF3OB_x writing of Timothy Keller, founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City.  Though Keller doesn’t mention the new Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States by name in this piece–“How Do Christians Fit Into the Two-Party System? They Don’t”–it’s clear the virulent partisanship surrounding the appointment hearing and subsequent additional FBI investigation of Brett Kavanaugh served as the New York Times‘ impetus for publishing this essay, an excerpt from Keller’s book Prodigal Prophet: Jonah and the Mystery of God’s Mercy.  (Kudos to the Times for publishing a piece that doesn’t pander to its usual political slants.)  Keller provides the kind of middle-ground sensibility here that causes some Christians to yearn for a third branch of American politics: Keller on the Insufficiency of America’s Two-Party System for Christianity.

The Lord be with you!

About Warren Anderson

Emmaus Road Worshipers is written by Dr. Warren Anderson, Director of the Demoss Center for Worship in the Performing Arts at Judson University (Elgin, Ill.), where he also directs the Judson University Choir. A Judson alumnus, he has served his alma mater in a number of capacities over the past 30+ years, especially the chapel ministry, which he led for 22 years. From 1982-2016, Dr. Anderson served six different churches--American Baptist (X2), Converge, Evangelical Free Church of America, Roman Catholic, and United Methodist--as a "weekend warrior" worship musician/pastor. He is a former member of the editorial board of Worship Leader magazine. The views expressed in this blog are not necessarily the views of Judson University.
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